Behavior

Behavior

Me and Pip - 2b

The bond that clients have with their pets is an integral part of veterinary medicine. Behavior issues are often misunderstood, unexpected, frustrating and, many times, difficult to manage. They can lead to a weakening or severance of that crucial and emotional bond between human and animal. Behavior problems cause stress in animals and those involved with their care, further exacerbating the underlying problems. Behavior consultations at Peak Veterinary Referral Center are performed in a caring and compassionate manner and help both clients and pets create more stable, predictable, and consistent interactions with each other. Consultations encompass diagnosis, reasonable expectations and prognosis, and a treatment plan which may include environmental adjustments, behavior modification, and pharmacological approaches.

Behavior issues that are commonly seen for consultations include:

Dogs:

  • Barking, jumping, leash-pulling, unruly behaviors
  • Attention seeking behaviors
  • Separation related anxiety
  • Fearful behaviors
  • Environmental phobias, such as noise and thunderstorms
  • Housetraining, marking and elimination disorders
  • Aggression to people or other animals
  • Compulsive disorders

Cats:

  • Fearful behaviors
  • Inappropriate elimination problems
  • Marking behaviors
  • Aggression to people or other animals
  • Compulsive disorders

Dr. Perry is a 1989 graduate of Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine and has a PhD focusing on shelter animal behavior and welfare.  She is a lecturer in Veterinary Behavior at Cornell where she is completing her behavior residency. Pam is also a native Vermonter!

Prior to your appointment, please complete a behavior history form on your pet:

Feline History Form

Canine History Form